Genetically modified plants and human health

2019-11-23 02:59

PDF Genetically modified (or GM) plants have attracted a large amount of media attention in recent years and continue to do so. Despite this, the general public remains largely unaware of what arisk to human health, and that additional ingestion of GM DNA has no effect. 1 Introduction The Royal Society report, Genetically modified plants for food use (1998), concludedthat the use of genetically modified (GM) plants potentially offered benefits in agricultural practice, food quality, nutrition and health, genetically modified plants and human health

Oct 01, 2001 So long as the risks to human health from transgenic plants remain potential rather than actual, and, in any event, appear lower than those from traditional plant breeding, hazard assessment need not be extensive.

Jun 01, 2008 From the first generation of GM crops, two main areas of concern have emerged, namely risk to the environment and risk to human health. As GM plants are gradually being introduced into the European Union there is likely to be increasing public concern regarding potential health issues. Jun 01, 2008 Genetically modified (or GM) plants have attracted a large amount of media attention in recent years and continue to do so. Despite this, the general public remains largely unaware of what a GM plant actually is or what advantages and disadvantages the technology has to offer, particularly withgenetically modified plants and human health [Genetically modified foods currently available on the international market have passed safety assessments and are not likely to present risks for human health. In addition, no effects on human health have been shown as a result of the consumption of such foods by the general population in the countries where they have been approved.

Genetically modified plants and human health free

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